Do we really have to fight about THIS one?


If we can agree that as a society and economy we have to reduce our resource consumption, with wiser oil use and reduced greenhouse emissions at the top of the list (and, what, 75%, 90%, 95% of us can?) we're naturally going to look first for the most painless ways to cut down, right? Seems to me some minor adjustment of the container we use to bring stuff home from the grocery or drug store would be about as painless as it gets, so I threw the idea out in this column.

If we really have to fight this one out as a test case for personal freedom, what happens when we get to the tough changes? You gotta be pretty damn stubborn to hold onto optimism...

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Anthropocene

The Anthropocene defines Earth's most recent geologic time period as being human-influenced, or anthropogenic, based on overwhelming global evidence that atmospheric, geologic, hydrologic, biospheric and other earth system processes are now altered by humans. The word combines the root "anthropo", meaning "human" with the root "-cene", the standard suffix for "epoch" in geologic time. The Anthropocene is distinguished as a new period either after or within the Holocene, the current epoch, which began approximately 10,000 years ago (about 8000 BC) with the end of the last glacial period.

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