How do we re-establish connection when communication breaks down?

If we feel resentful or victimized by an interaction or lack of response, we are not asking ourselves these 3 critical questions: what’s my unfulfilled expectation in this situation, or, what intention isn’t being realized that I am disappointed or frustrated about? or, what do I need to say that I am not saying?

When there is a communication breakdown, how do we re-establish trust? It is personally challenging to recognize and own our 50% contribution to all breakdowns in which we are involved. Contrary to thinking that it may weaken our position, it actually strengthens us, and has the benefit of silently inviting the other party to step up and own their 50%. Whether they do or don’t, we have. We gain peace of mind and our integrity and personal power stays intact.

Susan Kramer-Pope

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Anthropocene

The Anthropocene defines Earth's most recent geologic time period as being human-influenced, or anthropogenic, based on overwhelming global evidence that atmospheric, geologic, hydrologic, biospheric and other earth system processes are now altered by humans. The word combines the root "anthropo", meaning "human" with the root "-cene", the standard suffix for "epoch" in geologic time. The Anthropocene is distinguished as a new period either after or within the Holocene, the current epoch, which began approximately 10,000 years ago (about 8000 BC) with the end of the last glacial period.

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