Immunization H1N1 Vaccine Update | Community Alert

Be aware the H1N1 swine flu is being touted by government and health agencies worldwide as the next pandemic and are selling millions of vaccines. In our opinion the fear of pandemic is being intentionally created without considering the side effects and possible health consequences of this and other vaccines which remain controversial at best. Additionally, the nasal mist introducing a live virus which may make the receiver contagious if they breath or sneeze near others. Become informed!

You can view a few selected videos here and download a State of Oregon brochure and find out more about personal, religious or medical exemptions. Nobody can force you or your child to take a vaccine!


Here's the news release from the school district:


Ashland School District has received a limited number of vaccines for H1N1 from Jackson County Health Department.
Because there are a limited number of vaccines, they will be made available to the following groups first:

  • School age children
  • Staff with secondary health conditions

Vaccinations are available in two forms:

  1. Nasal Mist – recommended for individuals up to age 49 who DO NOT have secondary health risks.
  2. Injection – recommended for individuals with secondary health conditions at this time. Secondary health conditions include asthma, diabetes, lung or cardiac issues, or compromised immunity.

Vaccines will be offered free of charge to the above groups.

If you have a student at Ashland High School, there will be a clinic on Tuesday, November 24. Please call Carol at 482-8771 ext 226. An appointment is required. We have 50 doses of the nasal mist and 100 doses of the injectable vaccine. After our initial supply is exhausted, we will continue to receive vaccine based on request.


If you have a student at another Ashland school, please email Belinda Brown, RN, at Nurse@ashland.k12.or.us for an appointment. You will be notified when your child can receive a vaccine. In grades K – 8, we have 100 doses of the nasal mist and 100 doses of the injectable vaccine. After our initial supply is exhausted, we will continue to receive vaccine based on request.


Parents, non school-age children and other community members can access the H1N1 vaccine through the local county health offices.


Source: Ashland High School & Jackson County

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Comment by Michelle Engel on December 9, 2009 at 3:14pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vy2ua57Kllk

Listen to the comment at around 5:32.

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